C Section Endometriosis Hysterectomy Myomectomy

 

C Section

Since 1990, C-sections have more than tripled from about 6 percent of all births to 21 percent, three studies report in The Lancet. And there are no “signs of slowing down,” the researchers write in a commentary about the studies. These days the most common incision used for a C-section is the “horizontal” or “bikini incision.” Scarring from the incision builds up underneath the incision as well as in the uterus. A common complaint after a C-section is the sensitivity of the scar itself. For instance, it may hurt to lean over to pick up a baby or may cause pain with lifting or other positional changes. Standing up straight may be painful as well as reaching over the head.In addition, the scar may cause a slight postural change, a sort of “pulling forward” that along with a decrease in the support of the back from the abdominal muscles could result in back pain.

  • Infertility – Intra-abdominal adhesive disease is associated with up to 15% to 20% of all cases of infertility1
  • Difficult/Longer repeat C-sections – Patients with prior surgery required a mean of 21 minutes to open their abdomens whereas patients without prior surgery required a mean of 6 minutes2.

But the possible consequences don’t stop there. The scarring can cause the adjacent muscles to develop trigger points that refer pain to areas like the clitoris or urethra. In addition, the adjacent connective tissue can become restricted also causing pain. Lastly, the scarring can irritate superficial nerves in the area of the scar.

During Stem Cell Recruitment Therapy, a full placental membrane is applied directly over the incision site on the areas of adhesion formation. The placental membrane will resorb naturally in the body within 3 weeks. The underlying premise of the placental membrane is that it provides a barrier layer with a robust source of tissue and vascular growth factors and provides a local anti-inflammatory environment, thus optimizing soft tissue healing of the surgical site.

González-Quintero, Víctor Hugo, and Francisco E Cruz-Pachano. “Preventing Adhesions in Obstetric and Gynecologic Surgical Procedures.” Reviews in Obstetrics and Gynecology 2.1 (2009): 38–45. Print.

 

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a chronic disorder in which the tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside of the uterus. This disorder is one of the most common reasons women develop adhesions. In both laparotomy and laparoscopy, about 20% to 30% of women will have their endometriosis return within 5 years.1

Adhesions can cause significant complications such as small bowel obstruction, infertility, chronic pelvic pain, and difficulty in postoperative treatment, including complexity during subsequent surgical procedure.2 The adhesions can build onto organs within the abdominal cavity, called pelvic adhesive disease.

  • Pain – Adhesive disease has been estimated to account for up to 50% of all cases of pelvic pain.
  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Small Bowel Obstruction – Adhesions have been implicated as the cause of 54% to 74% of all cases of SBO1

During Stem Cell Recruitment Therapy, a full placental membrane is applied directly over the areas where adhesions are most likely to form: on the pelvic walls, cul de sac, areas of raw/denuded peritoneum, and areas of previous lysed adhesions. The placental membrane will resorb naturally in the body within 3 weeks. The underlying premise of the placental membrane is that it provides a barrier layer with a robust source of tissue and vascular growth factors and provides a local anti-inflammatory environment, thus optimizing soft tissue healing of the surgical site.

1 https://www.webmd.com/women/endometriosis/surgery-for-endometriosis#1

2 González-Quintero, Víctor Hugo, and Francisco E Cruz-Pachano. “Preventing Adhesions in Obstetric and Gynecologic Surgical Procedures.” Reviews in Obstetrics and Gynecology 2.1 (2009): 38–45. Print.

 

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy is the surgical removal of the uterus and in some cases the surgery also removes the ovaries and fallopian tubes. A woman may have a hysterectomy for many different reasons such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis. A surgeon may only remove part of the uterus (subtotal) or all of it (total). Each year approximately 600,000 hysterectomies are performed in the United States.1 One third of American women will have had a hysterectomy by the age of 60. It is the 2nd most common gynecologic surgery.2 5 times more common than myomectomies in the treatment of fibroids.3 Even after the uterus is removed, adhesions can form upon the surrounding reproductive and pelvic organs, ranging from the ovaries to the bowels and bladder.

Adhesions can cause significant complications such as small bowel obstruction, infertility, chronic pelvic pain, and difficulty in postoperative treatment, including complexity during subsequent surgical procedure.4 The adhesions can build onto organs within the abdominal cavity, called pelvic adhesive disease.

  • Pain – Adhesive disease has been estimated to account for up to 50% of all cases of pelvic pain.
  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Small Bowel Obstruction – Adhesions have been implicated as the cause of 54% to 74% of all cases of SBO1

During Stem Cell Recruitment Therapy, a full placental membrane is applied directly over the areas where adhesions are most likely to form: on the pelvic walls, cul de sac, areas of raw/denuded peritoneum, and areas of previous lysed adhesions. The placental membrane will resorb naturally in the body within 3 weeks. The underlying premise of the placental membrane is that it provides a barrier layer with a robust source of tissue and vascular growth factors and provides a local anti-inflammatory environment, thus optimizing soft tissue healing of the surgical site.

1 https://www.brighamandwomens.org/obgyn/minimally-invasive-gynecologic-surgery/hysterectomy-options 8 Pal, Bhaskar. “Adhesion Prevention in Myomectomy.” Journal of Gynecological Endoscopy and Surgery 2.1 (2011):

2 http://www.drseckin.com/pelvic-adhesion-surgery

3 http://www.drseckin.com/myomectomy

4 González-Quintero, Víctor Hugo, and Francisco E Cruz-Pachano. “Preventing Adhesions in Obstetric and Gynecologic Surgical Procedures.” Reviews in Obstetrics and Gynecology 2.1 (2009): 38–45. Print.

 

Myomectomy

Myomectomy is the removal of fibroids (benign tumors), without removing the uterus. Myomectomy is the preferred fibroid removal treatment for women who want to become pregnant. Even with laparoscopic procedures, adhesions can form along the anterior and posterior uterine wall.

Currently there is no treatment for adhesions; some complications from adhesions may require adhesiolysis (the removal of existing adhesions), which may result in additional adhesions. Surgical technique alone is not enough to prevent adhesions. Adhesion barriers may be placed during surgery to reduce the incidence and severity of adhesions before they form – the most common being Gynecare Interceed® and Seprafilm®

During Stem Cell Recruitment Therapy, the placental membrane is used as a protective, therapeutic barrier to prevent the formation of adhesions. The purpose of this barrier is to reduce the incidence, extent and severity of postoperative adhesions. The tissue acts as a mechanical barrier to prevent adhesions from forming, but is also full of hundreds of proteins and growth factors that enhance healing and tissue repair.